Glossary of Terms

Glossary of Terms

We operate WJDesigns on a personable yet professional level with clients, by not trying to baffle them with technical jargon or “techie speak”, but rather discuss their individual needs in layman’s terms.  Below are terms you will hear when developing your website.  Hopefully, this will take some of the confusion out of the process.

Website Designs – Is the process of creating the web pages that makeup a website. Web pages contain active content, such as hyperlink, contact forms and graphic features. Once the web pages have been completed, these pages must be published to a web host to be available to available to computers connected to the Internet

IP Address – Also known as an “IP number” or simply an “IP,” this is a code made up of numbers separated by three dots that identifies a particular computer on the Internet. Every computer, whether it be a Web server or the computer you’re using right now, requires an IP address to connect to the Internet. IP addresses consist of four sets of numbers from 0 to 255, separated by three dots. For example “” or “”. Your Internet Service Provider (ISP), will assign you either a static IP address (which is always the same) or a dynamic IP address, (which changes every time you log on). ISPs typically assign dial-up users a dynamic IP address each time they sign on because it reduces the number of IP addresses they must register. However, if you connect to the Internet through a network or broadband connection, it is more likely that you have a static IP address.

HTML – Stands for “Hyper-Text Markup Language.” This is the language that Web pages are written in. Also known as hypertext documents, Web pages must conform to the rules of HTML in order to be displayed correctly in a Web browser. The HTML syntax is based on a list of tags that describe the page’s format and what is displayed on the Web page.

Domain Name – This is the name that identifies an Web site. For example, “” is the domain name of Microsoft’s Web site. A single Web server can serve Web sites for multiple domain names, but a single domain name can point to only one machine. For example, Apple Computer has Web sites at,, and Each of these sites could be served on different machines. Then there are domain names that have been registered, but are not connected to a Web server. The most common reason for this is to have e-mail addresses at a certain domain name without having to maintain a Web site. In these cases, the domain name must be connected to a machine that is running a mail server.

Website – A website, or Web site, is not the same thing as a Web page. Though the two terms are often used interchangeably, they should not be. So what’s the difference? To put it simply, a Web site is a collection of Web pages. For example, is a Web site, but there are millions of Web pages that make up the site. Knowing the difference between these two terms can save you a lot of embarrassment.

FTP – Stands for “File Transfer Protocol.” It is a common method of transferring files via the Internet from one computer to another. Some common FTP programs are “Fetch” for the Mac, and “WS_FTP” for Windows. However, you can also use a Web browser like Netscape or Internet Explorer to access FTP servers. To do this, you need to type the URL of the server into the location field of the browser. For example: “” will give you a listing of all the directories of the FTP server, “” will give you a listing of all the files available in that directory, and “” will download the actual file to
your computer.

Web Host – In order to publish a website online, you need a Web host. The Web host stores all the pages of your website and makes them available to computers connected to the Internet. The domain name, such as “,” is actually linked to an IP address that points to a specific computer. When somebody enters your domain name into their browser’s address field, the IP address is located and Web site is loaded from your Web host.